Gettin’ Figgy With it! Guide to Oregon Figs

Oregon figs taste wonderful, hot to grow then in OregonAdam and Eve did. So did Buddha. In fact, there are numerous references in history ranging from Greek mythology to biblical scriptures that suggest that figs and fig trees are sacred. They symbolize abundance, fertility, and modesty which is depicted in images of Adam and Eve using leaves from a fig tree to cover their, ahem, private regions.

Fig trees are a variety of flowering trees that are related to the mulberry family originating in Asia. What makes them truly unique is that the trees do not produce flowers on their branches. Rather, the blossoms are found within the fig which gives the fruit its texture.

Figs have been cultivated all around the world and perform well in sunny, warm climates. That’s not to say that they won’t grow or produce fruit in the Pacific Northwest. With some planning and special considerations, you can grow Oregon figs that would make Adam and Eve blush.

The Basics of Growing Oregon Figs

By Alex Proimos from Sydney, Australia (Fig Tree) [CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

By Alex Proimos from Sydney, Australia (Fig Tree) [CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Fig trees prefer to grow in areas that are exposed to plenty of sun, either in the ground or in a pot. They also need plenty of drainage. Figs planted in pots won’t grow as large as their counterparts growing in the ground. However, it may make it easier to protect your tree during cold winter months if temperatures drop below freezing.

Pruning your fig tree should be done in January or February. The center should be open to allow light to penetrate to the center. Do this by removing the older growth. Unlike other species of trees, the fig tree is one of the few in which it is okay to cut the top of the branches to reduce height. This will also help introduce light to the center to help nurture the growing fruit.

There are a few species that are hardy and tend to fare better in the Pacific Northwest. If you are considering growing fig trees on your property, do some research to determine which ones would be best suited for your landscape. Depending on the variety, you may even get two crops of Oregon figs that ripen to perfection.  

Wanna Get Figgy With It?

Our tree care experts here at Arbor Pro love to get figgy with it so feel free to give us a call if you have questions. We proudly serve the greater Portland Metro area and surrounding communities. To learn more about how we can assist you, visit our website at www.arborpronw.com

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